News – Conservation

March 5, 2019

Demise of the Giants: The Fall of Africa’s Baobabs

What does it take to save the rhino? The list is long - tracking teams, vehicles, food, uniforms, binoculars, support staff and supporters, among many other things. But the most essential element needed to save the rhino is passion.
March 1, 2019

Desert Debate: Are horses more important than hyenas in our national parks?

By Willie Olivier   The fate of the remaining 73 wild horses of the southern Namib is an emotional issue. So it came as no surprise […]
February 20, 2019

Phantoms of the Skeleton Coast – Namibia’s desert lions

Salvadora persica, which goes by many common names such as miswak and arak in Arabia, or the mustard bush or toothbrush tree because its twigs can be used as a natural toothbrush.
February 15, 2019

The Plight of the Pangolin

Photographs  Jo Tagg   Pangolins certainly are not the most glamorous animals, yet they are the most trafficked. In Namibia, the fight against trafficking has become […]
January 22, 2019

Book Review: Conservation Pioneers in Namibia and Other Stories by Game Rangers, by Peter Bridgeford

The new book by Peter Bridgeford Reviewed by Willie Olivier If ever there was a compelling and insightful read it’s well-known conservationist Peter Bridgeford’s latest book, Conservation […]
December 22, 2018
Grootberg Lodge

Namibia among the Top 100 in the world in sustainable tourism

Press Release – 21 December 2018   ≠KHOADI-//HÔAS RECEIVES GLOBAL FIRST SUSTAINABLE TOURISM AWARD FOR NAMIBIA In a global first for Namibia, ≠Khoadi-//Hôas Conservancy in the […]
November 27, 2018

Lion Conservation and Sustainable Use

Namibia has a population of about 800 lions, similar to the period 1965 to 1980. Over the past 25 years, a fluctuating population in the Kunene Region in the northwest has increased from 20-30 animals to about 140-160. It is the only really significant lion population outside of protected areas in Namibia. The rest are all contained within national parks, except for small populations in some private wildlife areas.
September 21, 2018

The Greater Fish River Canyon Landscape

Landscape-level conservation is a Travel News Namibia series aimed at raising awareness of this highly effective conservation outlook. The first article, an introduction to all five appointed landscapes in Namibia, was published in the 2018 Winter Edition of Travel News Namibia. As a NAMPLACE project, landscape conservation received government funding from 2011 to 2016. Despite this limited timeframe, the intention was for each landscape to take stock of what has been learned in a 5-year course and use it as building blocks to continue conservation on a big scale. However, certain challenges still remain.
September 13, 2018

Fuelled by Passion – The RMB Namibia Ride for Rhinos

What does it take to save the rhino? The list is long - tracking teams, vehicles, food, uniforms, binoculars, support staff and supporters, among many other things. But the most essential element needed to save the rhino is passion.
September 6, 2018
O&L, Save the rhino international

Windhoek Lager supports Save The Rhino International

As a leading supporter and sponsor in the fight against rhino poaching in Namibia, subsidiary of the Ohlthaver & List (O&L) Group, Namibia Breweries Limited (NBL) […]
August 2, 2018

IRDNC Conservation News

IRDNC Highlights from Jan – June 2018 Completion of the first critical steps towards Africa’s First People’s Park (Kunene Region) The Lion Ranger Programme successfully inaugurated […]
July 17, 2018

Neuras – Wine and Wildlife Estate

Bright green vineyards are set against a harsh desert backdrop. Neuras Wine and Wildlife Estate mainly consists of stony desert or savannah grassland but nevertheless, it is an oasis in every sense of the word. Because the estate sits on a geological fault that creates a near-perfect terroir for cultivating grapes. Five springs provide pure water, while the mountains shield the earth from the unforgiving desert wind and the alkaline soil is just right for vines.
July 17, 2018

Joining Forces and Uniting Conservationists

Conservationists and biologists are usually, through the nature of their work, people who work in isolation – especially those that are field based. Communications between individuals or even organisations may be limited to formal information exchanged via publications, workshops or social media. Events that unite multiple people, structures and organisations in a personal and interactive manner, a sort of one-on-one interaction in the desert, swamp, ocean, savannah or wherever they might be working, are rare. 
July 17, 2018

Life Skills From the Camel-Thorn Tree

On a recent trip to Wolwedans I found myself in awe of the thriving desert life. It hasn’t rained here in the last five years, but that doesn’t mean that this part of the world has come to a standstill. Au contraire. We discovered life, and more significantly, growth in the desert. Inspired by the acacia forest we came across I dug up some interesting facts about the hardy camel-thorn tree. My motto for 2018 is “Be as tough as a camel-thorn.” Here is why:
July 9, 2018
angling

Zambezi Classic angling competition 2018

The annual international Zambezi Classic angling competition takes place from the 28th to 31st of August at the Nwanyi Angling Club at Katima Mulilo. It is […]

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