World Giraffe Day – Stand up for the Giraffe

Skeleton Coast Fly-in Safaris
June 16, 2014
Namibia Int. Airport one of Top African Hubs
June 26, 2014

Giraffe train. Etosha. ©Anja Denker.

Main photograph by Giraffe train. Etosha. ©Anja Denker – Read more about Anja Denker HERE

Tomorrow, the day of the longest night in Namibia, the world is standing up for the tallest animal – so stick out your neck for the Giraffe Day on 21 June 2014 (For ideas & and more information visit www.worldgiraffeday.org or visit their Facebook page

Photography by Billy K. Dodson via www. giraffeconservation.org

Photography by Billy K. Dodson via www. giraffeconservation.org

DID YOU KNOW? – Do giraffe lie down?

  • Giraffe normally rest while standing up, but sometimes they can be observed lying down. When lying down, they fold their legs under their body, but keeping their necks held high. Giraffe have been known to continue browsing and ruminating in this resting position.  Occasionally, and only for very short periods of no more than 5 minutes, giraffe can sleep with their head resting back on their rump.  But this is an extremely exposed and vulnerable position, hence the brevity and rarety.  (DID YOU KNOW sourced from Giraffe Conservation Foundation)
Photo ©Lawrence I'anson  via www. giraffeconservation.org

Photo ©Lawrence I’anson via www. giraffeconservation.org

Zoos and other organisations, including the Giraffe Conservation Foundation, have marked the 21st of June in order to raise awareness for giraffe conservation in the wild and to help raise much needed funds to propel important on the ground conservation projects. (See more at www.worldgiraffeday.org).

In celebration of World Giraffe Day in Namibia, the Giraffe Conservation Foundation has organised a casual Friday on 20 June, TODAY, under the motto “Jeans4Giraffe”. Wear jeans or other casual clothes (maybe with a giraffe pattern?) and engage and motivate others to take part and to help fund much needed giraffe research and conservation projects in Namibia, the rest of Africa and globally.

Photograph Joe Dodson, South Luangwa via www. giraffeconservation.org

Photograph Joe Dodson,
South Luangwa via www. giraffeconservation.org

Giraffe Giraffes

Damaraland Giraffes. Photo © Julian Fennessy GCF

Here are some quotes from conservationists, depicting the pressure felt by Giraffe in the wild and what should be done: (For more quotes, visit www.giraffeconservation.org)

The decline of an iconic African wildlife species such as the Giraffe, and more specifically the scarce and vulnerable sub-species should be the concern not only to the scientific community and conservationist, but also governments and the population at large. Not only will the loss of these animals be a tragedy, but also a stern warning that the loss of biodiversity and functional ecosystems will eventually affect all of us. In our efforts to preserve the giraffe as a species our efforts should first of all focus on the preservation of suitable habitat. With a growing human population the degradation and fragmentation of suitable habitat is a reality. Through research there is a greater understanding of the importance of corridors and linkages of conservation areas to ensure the sustainability and health of current populations through the exchange of genetic material and effective ecosystem function. Due to the wide distribution of giraffe as a species in Africa, an organization such as the GCF that can act as a linkage between scientists and which can actively promote a coordinated effort to ensure the survival of the species, will be invaluable.Prof. Nico Smit, Dept. of Animal, Wildlife and Grassland Sciences, University of the Free State, South Africa

Giraffe Giraffes

Photo © Julian Fennessy GCF

Giraffes are some of Africa’s most iconic, popular and engaging species and yet, surprisingly, we don’t know enough about them. You can’t properly protect what you don’t understand, which makes GCF’s work and research absolutely vital to securing their future. – Sarah Borchert, Editor, Africa Geographic Magazine

Giraffe drinking at roadside in Etosha. Photo: ©Annabelle Venter

Giraffe drinking at roadside in Etosha. Photo: ©Annabelle Venter

When I studied giraffe in South Africa in the 1950s, and co-authored a scientific book about them in 1976 and 1982, I never imagined that they might become endangered or even that there would be huge interest in them in the coming years. Now I am writing a new book: ‘Giraffe: Biology and Conservation’. Discovering fascinating new information provided in part by the Giraffe Conservation Foundation and its members is exciting. The work they do is essential for the future of this wonderful animal. Bless them! – Dr Anne Innis Dagg, Faculty Member & Author, University of Waterloo, Canada

kalahari red dune lodge

Kalahari Giraffe by Yolanda Nel

Wildlife conservation is a passion and a commitment and I feel I owe a debt of gratitude for the success it has brought me as an artist. I was recently invited to be a patron of the Giraffe Conservation Foundation and I am extremely proud to be working with this wonderful organisation. It enables me to channel my energy into raising funds through the sale of my work and at the same time I can hopefully make a valid contribution from everything I have learnt and loved in so many places around the world, especially in Africa. – Mandy Shepherd, Artist, Conservationist & GCF Patron, UK

 

Travel News Namibia
Travel News Namibia
Travel News Namibia is a high-quality glossy Namibia travel and lifestyle magazine tasked with promoting Namibia to the world. With riveting stories, first-hand encounters and magnificent photographs showcasing tourism, travel, nature, adventure and conservation, TNN is the ultimate and most comprehensive guide to exploring Namibia. Travel News Namibia is published in five different editions per year. These include four English- language editions and one German. Travel News Namibia is for sale in Namibia and South Africa.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Magazine Subscription

Please fill out the form below and we will get in touch with you

Title

Full Name

Email

Delivery address

Namibia - N$ 210

International - €50

EFT Direct Deposits can be made to the following account:

Account Name: Venture Publications (Pty) Ltd

Bank : Bank Windhoek

Branch code: 48-19-72-00, Windhoek

Swift code: BWLINANX

Acknowledgement of payment will only be made upon receipt of a deposit slip.

Deposit slips can be e-mailed together with subscription form to bonn@venture.com.na

Contact Us

Please fill out the form below and we will get in touch with you

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message